Friday, August 19, 2016

The Georgia Guidestones Conspiracy


Over the years, many of my readers have expressed their interest in the Georgia Guidestones. Today I received the following from Kara Dueck, who is a part of the production team of the digital series Guidestones...a story, based on true events, about two journalism students who uncover a global conspiracy while investigating an unsolved murder:

Georgia Guidestones: The Conspiracy that Inspired the Emmy-Award Winning Series

Erected in Elbert County, Georgia March 22, 1980, this granite monument has since become the centre of numerous conspiracies. With ten guides or commandments inscribed on the stones in eight different languages, the first one reads “Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature”. Conspiracy theorists interpret this as evidence of an impending apocalypse orchestrated by an elitist secret society. The Canadian Emmy-award winning digital series, Guidestones, explores the conspiracy surrounding the monument.

The series follows an international journalism student, Sandy, who becomes caught in a global conspiracy while investigating an unsolved murder. Upon discovering the Guidestones, she finds the pseudonym “R.C. Christian” inscribed on the nearby instruction tablet. Many believe it refers to the Order of Rosicrucian, a secret society, which first appeared in Protestant Germany in the early 17th century.

Sandy is led to a particular Rosicrucian organization called the Ancient Mystical Order of Rosae Crucis (AMORC), founded in 1915 and stylizes itself as a non-sectarian institution of philosophy and mysticism. Sandy comes to believe it is not as it seems.

Traveling around the world, she uncovers a nefarious corporation intent on using its technology to cull the global population and form a New World Order. Sandy is faced with challenges and mysteries she never expected, including her own shocking connection to the conspiracy.

Kara Dueck
The Guidestones Team


Video - Brad Meltzer's Decoded: Apocalypse in Georgia

NOTE: To be honest, I haven't researched the Georgia Guidestones to the point where I feel comfortable making any assessments. I will be taking some time to watch the series...from what I've seen so far, it looks to be a very engaging production. This link - George Guidestones - America's Stonehenge - offers interesting details on the mysterious structure. Lon

The Georgia Guidestones: America's Most Mysterious Movement

Apocalypse In Georgia [HD]

The Illuminati: Facts & Fiction


Gruesome Origins of Favorite Fairy Tales


Fairy tales of the past were often full of macabre and gruesome twists and endings. Disney and other film production companies have sanitized these stories for a modern audience that is deemed unable to cope with something other than a happy ending. This list looks at some of the common endings we are familiar with...and explains the original gruesome origins.

The Pied Piper - Robert Browning

In the tale of the Pied Piper, we have a village overrun with rats. A man arrives dressed in clothes of pied (a patchwork of colors) and offers to rid the town of the vermin. The villagers agree to pay a vast sum of money if the piper can do it - and he does. He plays music on his pipe which draws all the rats out of the town. When he returns for payment - the villagers won’t cough up so the Pied Piper decides to rid the town of children too! In most modern variants, the piper draws the children to a cave out of the town and when the townsfolk finally agree to pay up, he sends them back. In the darker original, the piper leads the children to a river where they all drown (except a lame boy who couldn’t keep up). Some modern scholars say that there are connotations of pedophilia in this fairy tale. The Pied Piper of Hamelin

Little Red Riding Hood - Brothers Grimm

The version of this tale that most of us are familiar with ends with Riding Hood being saved by the woodsman who kills the wicked wolf. But in fact, the original French version (by Charles Perrault) of the tale was not quite so nice. In this version, the little girl is a well bred young lady who is given false instructions by the wolf when she asks the way to her grandmothers. Foolishly riding hood takes the advice of the wolf and ends up being eaten. And here the story ends. There is no woodsman - no grandmother - just a fat wolf and a dead Red Riding Hood. The moral to this story is to not take advice from strangers. Little Red Riding Hood

The Little Mermaid - Hans Christian Andersen

The 1989 version of the Little Mermaid might be better known as “The big whopper!” In the Disney version, the film ends with Ariel the mermaid being changed into a human so she can marry Eric. They marry in a wonderful wedding attended by humans and merpeople. But, in the very first version by Hans Christian Andersen, the mermaid sees the Prince marry a princess and she despairs. She is offered a knife with which to stab the prince to death, but rather than do that she jumps into the sea and dies by turning to froth. Hans Christian Andersen modified the ending slightly to make it more pleasant. In his new ending, instead of dying when turned to froth, she becomes a “daughter of the air” waiting to go to heaven - so, frankly, she is still dead for all intents and purposes. The Little Mermaid

Snow White - Brothers Grimm

In the tale of snow white that we are all familiar with, the Queen asks a huntsman to kill her and bring her heart back as proof. Instead, the huntsman can’t bring himself to do it and returns with the heart of a boar. Now, fortunately disney hasn’t done too much damage to this tale, but they did leave out one important original element: in the original tale, the Queen actually asks for Snow White’s liver and lungs - which are to be served for dinner that night! Also in the original, Snow White wakes up when she is jostled by the prince’s horse as he carries her back to his castle - not from a magical kiss. What the prince wanted to do with a dead girl’s body I will leave to your imagination. Oh - in the Grimm version, the tale ends with the Queen being forced to dance to death in red hot iron shoes! Snow White

Sleeping Beauty - Brothers Grimm

In the original sleeping beauty, the lovely princess is put to sleep when she pricks her finger on a spindle. She sleeps for one hundred years when a prince finally arrives, kisses her, and awakens her. They fall in love, marry, and (surprise surprise) live happily ever after. But alas, the original tale is not so sweet (in fact, you have to read this to believe it.) In the original, the young woman is put to sleep because of a prophesy, rather than a curse. And it isn’t the kiss of a prince which wakes her up: the king seeing her asleep, and rather fancying having a bit, rapes her. After nine months she gives birth to two children (while she is still asleep). One of the children sucks her finger which removes the piece of flax which was keeping her asleep. She wakes up to find herself raped and the mother of two kids. Sleeping Beauty

Rumpelstiltskin - Brothers Grimm

This fair tale is a little different from the others because rather than sanitizing the original, it was modified by the original author to make it more gruesome. In the original tale, Rumpelstiltskin spins straw into gold for a young girl who faces death unless she is able to perform the feat. In return, he asks for her first born child. She agrees - but when the day comes to hand over the kid, she can’t do it. Rumpelstiltskin tells her that he will let her off the bargain if she can guess his name. She overhears him singing his name by a fire and so she guesses it correctly. Rumpelstiltskin, furious, runs away, never to be seen again. But in the updated version, things are a little messier. Rumpelstiltskin is so angry that he drives his right foot deep into the ground. He then grabs his left leg and rips himself in half. Needless to say this kills him. - Rumpelstiltskin

Goldilocks and the Three Bears - Robert Southey

In this heart warming tale, we hear of pretty little goldilocks who finds the house of the three bears. She sneaks inside and eats their food, sits in their chairs, and finally falls asleep on the bed of the littlest bear. When the bears return home they find her asleep - she awakens and escapes out the window in terror. The original tale (which actually only dates to 1837) has two possible variations. In the first, the bears find Goldilocks and rip her apart and eat her. In the second, Goldilocks is actually an old hag who (like the sanitized version) jumps out of a window when the bears wake her up. The story ends by telling us that she either broke her neck in the fall, or was arrested for vagrancy and sent to the “House of Correction”. Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Hansel and Gretel - Brothers Grimm

In the widely known version of Hansel and Gretel, we hear of two little children who become lost in the forest, eventually finding their way to a gingerbread house which belongs to a wicked witch. The children end up enslaved for a time as the witch prepares them for eating. They figure their way out and throw the witch in a fire and escape. In an earlier French version of this tale (called The Lost Children), instead of a witch we have a devil. Now the wicked old devil is tricked by the children (in much the same way as Hansel and Gretel) but he works it out and puts together a sawhorse to put one of the children on to bleed (that isn’t an error - he really does). The children pretend not to know how to get on the sawhorse so the devil’s wife demonstrates. While she is lying down the kids slash her throat and escape. Hansel and Gretel

The Girl Without Hands - Brothers Grimm

Frankly, the revised version of this fairy tale is not a great deal better than the original, but there are sufficient differences to include it here. In the new version, a poor man is offered wealth by the devil if he gives him whatever is standing behind his mill. The poor man thinks it is an apple tree and agrees - but it is actually his daughter. The devil tries to take the daughter but can’t - because she is pure, so he threatens to take the father unless the daughter allows her father to chop off her hands. She agrees and the father does the deed. Now - that is not particularly nice, but it is slightly worse in some of the earlier variants in which the young girl chops off her own arms in order to make herself ugly to her brother who is trying to rape her. In another variant, the father chops off the daughter’s hands because she refuses to let him have sex with her. Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales

Cinderella - Charles Perrault / Brothers Grimm

In the modern Cinderella fairy tale we have the beautiful Cinderella swept off her feet by the prince and her wicked step sisters marrying two lords - with everyone living happily ever after. The fairy tale has its origins way back in the 1st century BC where Strabo’s heroine was actually called Rhodopis, not Cinderella. The story was very similar to the modern one with the exception of the glass slippers and pumpkin coach. But, lurking behind the pretty tale is a more sinister variation by the Grimm brothers: in this version, the nasty step-sisters cut off parts of their own feet in order to fit them into the glass slipper - hoping to fool the prince. The prince is alerted to the trickery by two pigeons who peck out the step sister’s eyes. They end up spending the rest of their lives as blind beggars while Cinderella gets to lounge about in luxury at the prince’s castle. The Complete Fairy Tales (Oxford World's Classics)

NOTE: A brief bit about the Brothers Grimm - Jacob (1785–1863) and Wilhelm Grimm (1786–1859), were German academics, linguists, cultural researchers, and authors who together collected and published folklore. If you've ever read "Grimm's Fairy Tales" and felt they were a little dark for kids, you have German culture during the early 1800s to thank. After the book was published it attracted criticism for its sexual content, so the brothers edited these themes out of subsequent editions. But because the violence of the stories wasn't frowned upon in the same way, it was retained and in some cases even increased.

The brothers' academic careers were upset in 1837, though, by some political upheaval. When King Ernest Augustus I demanded oaths of allegiance from university professors and other civil servants, Jacob and Wilhelm refused. They were fired from their posts, along with five other professors, and three of the group, including Jacob, were deported. He moved back to Germany and was joined by Wilhelm, but found themselves impoverished, and had to rely on the financial support of friends.

In 1840 their fortunes changed when both Jacob and Wilhelm received job offers from the University of Berlin. There, they continued their research; further polished their folk tale collection, now in its third edition. The two brothers continued working together for the rest of their lives. When Wilhelm died in 1859, the Grimms' collection of folk tales had reached its 7th edition and had grown to 200 tales.

In the film, The Brothers Grimm the pair were depicted as con-artist pretending to remove evil spirits and malevolent entities as they traveled from town to town in 19th Century Germany. There is no basis for these characterizations and should be consider as fiction.

The Grimm's collection of folklore had already been popular during their lifetimes, but it went on to become one of the most celebrated works of German literature and the basis for countless books and movies during the next two centuries. On the list of the best-selling authors of all time, some figures place the Grimms in third place...preceded only by Shakespeare and the Bible. Extracted from CS Monitor - 10/20/2012


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Friday, August 12, 2016

Reader Submissions: Living in a Killer's House / Approached by the Departed


I received the following anecdotes several years ago:

When I first moved to GA from FL in 1991, I moved into a house in Smyrna with my future first wife and her two kids. The house was a 2-story ranch built in the early 60s. The basement had a large family room running almost the length of the house along with 2 bedrooms. There were several windows on the back side of the house, up high in the room, at about ground level outside. This is the room that had the TV. The house also had lots of walls with large drywall patches, that I initially couldn't explain. Anyway, at night I always felt something was watching me from those windows while I was watching TV. And it wasn't a warm and fuzzy feeling either. It was the kind of feeling of, I can't look at the window, because if I see something I will scream.

There were two weird, unexplainable things that happened in that house while I lived there that I know about. The first happened when I got home from work one late afternoon and went downstairs and laid on the couch with my back to the room and waited for my wife to get home. After a few minutes I heard someone walk from the direction of the stairs towards me and up behind me and stop. I figured it was my wife who was checking on me and thought I was asleep. Then I heard a big sigh and them walking away. Well about 20 minutes later my wife came home, I was all alone in the house!

The next thing that happened was when my stepdaughter and wife were cleaning her bedroom, which was downstairs in the basement. They were cleaning her dresser together and all of the sudden, a music box on the dresser opened up by itself and then closed by itself. Both of them initially just stood there stunned and didn't say anything and then came and got me.

One day, our neighbor Betty came over with a newspaper article. She had lived next door for years. She told us that a hit man for the Dixie Mafia had lived in the house for years. His name was John Elbert Ransom and Georgia authorities had him associated with 25 murders. At the time I lived in the house, he was in jail for conspiracy to commit murder. Betty told us all kind of stories, including that when they arrested him, they cut holes in the walls of the house looking for illegal drugs and guns.

I always wondered if one of his victims had come back to haunt him.

Bill

**********

About 8 years ago, I was living with my boyfriend who was one of 7 brothers and one sister. I was told about the sister Diane who was killed in 1971 in a car accident. My boyfriend's 19 year old son lived with us until he was later killed in an accident. The next several weeks after he died, I heard footsteps coming to my room and sensed him by my bed. On one occasion, I felt so strongly he was standing there I even said "I know you are there...it's ok to show yourself. I wont be afraid". He replied telepathically "I can't always show myself...it's a universal law".I had never heard the term "universal law" prior to that.

One night, around 3am, I heard loud talking and footsteps coming through the house. Suddenly, my boyfriend's son was at the end of my bed saying "Hey Sue! Diane is here and she wants to talk to you". I turned and saw a girl next to me in bed! She looked like a real person even though it was dark. I noticed her hair shimmered...catching any bit of light and her skin was white but wasn't pasty and had a luminous quality. I said to her "Diane, you are here! Every since I have lived in this area and been around your family I have been told you are dead." I soon found out not to say this to a spirit/ghost because she quickly corrected me very sternly saying "I have always been alive...I have NEVER been dead!" She told me to tell the family her name was on a wall and now its covered. She kissed my cheek and hugged me then vanished.

There I was sitting up wondering if I was dreaming and wondering why my boyfriend wasn't next to me. I soon heard the toilet flush and my boyfriend climbing back in bed. I asked him if he heard talking or noises. I told him his son and sister were just here and I talked to his sister. He first told me "aww, go back to sleep." But I described his sister and told him what she said to me and he sobbed as the other family members did as they said "Oh, yes, that was Diane".

I later learned what her message meant. When Diane was a little girl she wrote her name on the basement wall in the old house where they had lived. Since it had been torn down so indeed her name is "covered". I have been visited by relatives, friends and others I do not know. Sue

Ghost Stories from the American South (American Storytelling)

Mississippi Mud: Southern Justice and the Dixie Mafia

Shooting the mob - Organized crime in photos. Dead Mobsters, Gangsters and Hoods.